Inspire Preschool

Faculty

Teachers observe children as they play, paying close attention to recurring themes, children's understandings and misunderstandings, developmental issues, and underlying questions. Our observations guide our curriculum planning, as we create novel opportunities for children to deepen their thinking, represent their understandings and encounter new perspectives. We cherish what we learn from one another and respect each other's contributions.

Katie Thompson

Katie Thompson

Director and Teacher

Katie is Director qualified for a large childcare center and holds a Level IV Early Childhood Education Credential from the Colorado Department of Human Services and the Colorado Department of Education. She holds a Bachelor's degree from Wheaton College.


Sharon Prairie

Sharon Prairie

Director and Teacher

Sharon is Director qualified for a large childcare center and holds a Level IV Early Childhood Education Credential from the Colorado Department of Human Services and the Colorado Department of Education. She holds a Master's degree in Special Education from the University of Northern Colorado and a Bachelor's degree in Communication Disorders from Emerson College in Boston.


The Role of the Teacher

Being an early childhood educator within the Reggio Emilia approach is complex. The role of the teacher is first and foremost to be that of a learner alongside the children. The teacher is a teacher-researcher, a resource and guide as she/he lends expertise to children (Edwards, 1993). Within such a teacher-researcher role, educators carefully listen, observe and document children's work and the growth of community in their classroom. Teachers provoke, co-construct, and stimulate thinking and children's collaboration with peers. Teachers are committed to reflection about their own teaching and learning.

  • Co-explore the learning experiences with the children
  • Provoke ideas, assist with problem solving and conflict resolution
  • Take cues from the children and provide opportunities for further explorations
  • Organize the classroom and materials to be aesthetically pleasing
  • Facilitate children’s thoughtful decisions
  • Document children's progress:  photographs, videos, displays and portfolios
  • Support children in discovering the connections in learning and experiences
  • Scaffold children in expressing their knowledge through representational work
  • Form a community among teachers and parents
  • Have a dialogue about children’s projects with parents
  • Foster the connection between home, school and community